Tag Archives: heart disease

Taco Bell now offers an AVA certified vegetarian and vegan menu! 

By Lynn Griffith | October 4, 2015   The Vegetarian Times Study reported that 7.3 million Americans are vegetarian and an additional 22.8 million Americans follow a vegetarian inclined diet.(1) The vegetarian diet has been continually growing in popularity.  Vegetarians have a lower risk of developing heart disease, colorectal, ovarian and breast cancers, diabetes, obesity and hypertension.  The diet is typically low in fat and high in fiber, though it is possible to eat excessive amounts …

World Vegetarian Day: Learn health facts regarding vegetarianism

… the evidence regarding vegetarianism is really overwhelming, and it shows that plant based diets are probably one of the best things we can do for our bodies. They help to lower your body weight, they might reduce the risk of some cancers. Plant based diets can also be great for lowering the risk of heart disease and even help people live a little longer. Watch the entire video. Here are advantages of becoming a vegetarian: lower bad cholesterol levels, decrease constipation, improve overall …

6 Things That Happen To Your Body When You Go Vegetarian

… bacteria in the gut. Because it can take some time for your intestinal tract to adapt to its new residents, you can initially feel gassy and bloated. But with patience, you’ll adapt. Plus, Applegate points out: “Plant-based diets have been shown to lower the risk for various chronic diseases along with waist size,” she says. You May Protect Yourself From heart disease Several large studies involving more than 76,000 men and women have compared vegetarians and non-vegetarians …

6 Delicious Vegetarian Dishes Requiring 5 Ingredients or Fewer

By Kirsten Klahn | April 27, 2015 Being a vegetarian — or even a part-time vegetarian — is not only good for you, it’s also good for the environment. Women’s Health notes that limiting the meat you eat reduces your likelihood for heart disease. “Fatty red meats and many processed meats are high in saturated fat, which raises LDL (bad) cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease,” Rachel K. Johnson, a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association and professor of …

5 Habits Of Vegetarians You Should Steal

… them. It’s key, because eating more veggies is one of the most impactful dietary changes you can make, but about 75% of adults fall short of the minimum recommended three daily servings. Fitting in just one additional portion per day can slash your risk of heart disease by as much as 11%, and making veggies the star of your plate can lead to a myriad of benefits. From today on, when choosing what’s for lunch or dinner, select your veggies to start, then add lean protein, good fat, and …

Study reveals eating more vegetables and less red meat may lessen the odds of developing cataracts | UTSanDiego.com

… meat were 30 percent more likely to die during a 10-year period vs. people who ate the least amount of meat. Those who ate poultry and fish had a lower risk of death vs. meat eaters. People who ate a lot of sausage, lunch meat and other processed meats increased their risk of death. “People that eat a plant-based diet generally eat fewer calories, less fat, weigh less and have a lower risk of heart disease than do those who eat a lot of meat,” Feldman said. Age-related cataracts are the …

5 habits of vegetarians you should steal | Fox News

… are often an afterthought. Obviously my vegetarian and vegan clients don’t eat meat, but I advise everyone—including omnivores—to think about veggies first and build the rest of their meals around them. It’s key, because eating more veggies is one of the most impactful dietary changes you can make, but about 75 percent of adults fall short of the minimum recommended three daily servings. Fitting in just one additional portion per day can slash your risk of heart disease by as much as …

Vegetarian diet reduces heart disease risk by 20% – Mirror Online

By Andrew Gregory, 5 March 2015  Vegetarian diet reduces heart disease risk by 20% Scientists made the discovery after analysing the eating and lifestyle habits of more than 450,000 people for more than a decade Turning vegetarian or just eating more veg could reduce your chance of heart disease by up to 20%. Scientists made the discovery after analysing the eating and lifestyle habits of more than 450,000 people for more than a decade. Those who got 70% of their food from plant sources were …

Protein Plus – Livemint

A study published in The JAMA Network Journals last year says that eating a vegetarian diet can help lower blood pressure. A year earlier, a report in the same journal had said vegetarian diets help reduce the risk of several chronic diseases, including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus and ischaemic heart disease. A growing body of scientific evidence indicates that wholesome vegetarian diets offer distinct advantages. So if one of your resolutions for this year is to give up …

Plant-based diets lead to weight loss, study finds | Stuff.co.nz

… that’s sustainable?” Levin said. The researchers reviewed 15 studies focused on plant-based diets, from vegan (no animal products) to vegetarian diets in which followers eat eggs and dairy products but no meat. Half the studies were intended to help participants lose weight; the others were to treat health concerns such as diabetes, chronic pain or arthritis. Obesity and overweight are linked to such diseases as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers. Observational studies …

No meat? No problem: Vegetarian recipes the whole family will love | Things to do in Tampa Bay | Tampa Bay Times

… that eating red meat every other day, instead of daily, can substantially reduce heart disease risk. But it’s not just health. The Meatless Monday campaign says it saves money, both in doctor bills by reducing health risks, and because meals built around vegetables, beans and grains tend to be less expensive. As for the environment, the water and fossil fuel needs of livestock are much greater than those of vegetables and grains. One fewer burger a week for a year would be the equivalent …

LETTER: For health’s sake, go vegetarian in 2015

It’s time for New Year’s resolutions, particularly those about our health. Although gun violence remains the leading cause of death among young people, our most dangerous weapon is still our fork. Forty-five times as many people die of chronic diseases linked to a diet containing animal products, sugar, and salt. Hardly a month goes by without another study linking consumption of animal products with obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, stroke and certain cancers. No …

Meatless Monday to help the Earth | Care2 Healthy Living

It’s never too late to join the Meatless Monday movement! Meatless Monday was started in 2003 by former advertising executive Sid Lerner. He decided to partner with Johns Hopkins University to revive the former war rationing effort in the name of public health. At the time, the goal was to combat heart disease and other diet-related illnesses by helping Americans reduce their intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol from meat by about 15 percent. In the decade since, however, we’ve learned …

Need protein? Try these tips | Sandusky Register

… beneficial to one’s health,” says Brooke Alpert, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and founder of B Nutritious. Vegetarians are at lower risk for developing heart disease, colorectal, ovarian and breast cancers, diabetes, obesity and hypertension, according to the American Dietetic Association. “Even if you aren’t interested or ready to go vegan or vegetarian, seeking an alternative protein source for at least one meal a week can be beneficial,” says Alpert. With that in mind, Alpert …

Meatless meals even meat eaters will love – St. Joseph News-Press and FOX 26 KNPN: Life

In a region where beef often is what’s for dinner, it’s hard to make the case for vegetables, much less convince people to forgo meat altogether. However, heart disease and obesity are problems of epidemic proportions in America, so more people are finding ways to cut down their meat intake. One way to do this is to make vegetables the star attraction of the dinner plate. Lexi Moore, a volunteer with Goode Food-Delivered, has been a vegetarian since she was 19 but is engaged to a meat eater. …

Living life without meat

… pressure, lower bad cholesterol, and less heart disease. Vegetarians tend to maintain a healthier weight, which leads to less inflammation and fewer incidences of stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and dementia. The vegetarian diet also typically has increased fiber intake because vegetarians eat more fruits, vegetables and grains, which are all fiber-rich foods. “Just not eating meat isn’t what makes being a vegetarian lifestyle healthy,” Garza said. “You …

Nutrition Know-How: The components of a vegetarian diet

… of health advantages including lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure levels, lower risk of heart disease and a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Below are some nutrients found in meat or dairy that are often misconstrued as lacking from  vegetarian diets. Protein Research indicates that an assortment of plant foods eaten over the course of a day can provide all protein needed in healthy adults. This fact shows that complementary proteins do not need to be consumed at the same meal …

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